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What is Tooth Resorption (Injury)?

Dental resorption is a condition that refers to the loss of the root or enamel tissues of a tooth in a way that should not normally occur; this can occur as tooth tissues dissolve or disappear for a variety of reasons.

Tooth resorption usually presents with symptoms such as pain, sensitivity or discoloration of the tooth. It is diagnosed using dental X-rays and other imaging techniques. Treatment may vary depending on the severity and causes of resorption. In case of internal resorption, procedures such as root canal treatment or tooth extraction may be considered. In case of external resorption, various treatment options are evaluated depending on the condition of the tooth. Tooth resorption can be controlled with early diagnosis and appropriate treatment, so regular dental examinations are important.

Normal Root Resorption

Normal root resorption is a normal and physiologic event that occurs normally and physiologically at certain periods of an individual's life during tooth development and tooth replacement. This process occurs in order to reduce the root structure of the tooth at certain stages and to allow the tooth to assume a proper position within the jawbone.

Normal root resorption occurs especially during the process of deciduous tooth loss and replacement by permanent teeth. During childhood, deciduous teeth undergo root resorption to make room in the jaw bones. This prepares a suitable place for permanent teeth to erupt. As a result of this resorption process, the roots of the milk teeth dissolve in the jaw bones and the tooth naturally falls out.

Normal root resorption also occurs during the replacement of permanent teeth. This process takes place in order for the permanent tooth to take up an appropriate position in the jaw and align harmoniously with the other teeth. X-rays performed by the dentist can be used to monitor this normal resorption process and evaluate tooth development.

Normal root resorption is important for the healthy growth and development of teeth. However, when this process occurs excessively or abnormally, a condition called pathological root resorption can occur. Pathologic root resorption usually occurs due to trauma, infection or other factors and may require treatment.

Causes of Root Resorption

Root resorption refers to a condition in which the tooth root dissolves or disappears more than normal. This can occur for a variety of reasons. Here are common causes of root resorption:

Trauma: Trauma to the tooth, especially blows, accidents or sports injuries, can cause root resorption. Damage to the root structure of the tooth can trigger the resorption process.

Orthodontic Treatment: Long-term orthodontic treatment can increase the risk of root resorption, which can occur during tooth movement. This can occur when the teeth shift and find their proper position.

Periodontal Diseases: Severe gum disease can cause the loss of supportive tissues around the tooth. This can damage the root of the tooth and trigger resorption.

Dental Traffication: Dental crowding is a condition in which teeth are out of space. This can lead to root resorption, increasing the risk of collision with other teeth or exposure to pressure.

Infections:

Genetic Factors: Some genetic conditions may predispose individuals to root resorption. Familial inheritance can be considered in this context.

Endodontic Treatment Complications: Inadequate or failed endodontic (root canal) treatments can damage the tooth root and cause resorption.

Pathological Formations:

Combinations or a combination of these factors can contribute to root resorption. Treatment may vary depending on the causes of root resorption and is usually evaluated by the dentist.

Treatment of resorption

Treatment of tooth root resorption can vary depending on the causes, severity and location of the resorption. Here are some common root resorption treatment methods:

Root Canal Treatment:

Orthodontic Treatment: In cases of resorption caused by abnormal movements between the teeth, orthodontic treatment can be applied. Moving the teeth into their proper positions can prevent the progression of resorption.

Dental Extraction and Prosthodontics: If resorption is too advanced and it is not possible to save the tooth, tooth extraction may be considered. Replacing the extracted tooth with a prosthesis, implant or other restorative options may be important for function and aesthetics.

Surgical Treatment: Surgical intervention may be necessary in some cases. Surgical interventions may be performed to remove resorbed tissues, repair damaged areas or correct other problems caused by root resorption.

Antibiotic Therapy:

Anti-Resorptive Drugs:

The treatment plan is determined depending on the individual's condition and the characteristics of the resorption. Early diagnosis and treatment can help to better manage the problems associated with root resorption. Therefore, regular dental examinations and dental check-ups are important.

What are the Types of Resorption?

Resorption refers to the abnormal loss or resorption of dental tissues. This can occur due to different reasons. Resorption is classified into two main categories: internal resorption and external resorption;

Internal Resorption: Internal resorption is a type of resorption that occurs in the pulp chamber (the area of living tissue on the inside of the tooth). This condition usually occurs as a result of infections, trauma or other pathological conditions within the tooth. Internal resorption is characterized by the formation of a pathological cavity in the root canal on the inside of the tooth.

External Resorption: External resorption is a type of resorption that occurs on the root surface of the tooth or around the tooth. This condition usually occurs as a result of problems with the tissue outside the tooth. Enamel tissue on the outer surface of the tooth or dentin tissue on the root surface can be damaged, which can be a symptom of external resorption.

Both types of resorption can cause loss or changes in the structure of the tooth. Internal resorption is usually due to damage to the inside of the tooth, while external resorption occurs when the tissues on the outer surface of the tooth are affected. The treatment plan will depend on the type, degree and causes of resorption.

What are the Symptoms of Tooth Resorption?

Tooth resorption can be a condition that usually does not produce obvious symptoms, and sometimes the patient may not notice the signs. However, as resorption progresses or under certain conditions, the following symptoms may occur:

Pain or Sensitivity: Dental resorption can cause pain or sensitivity because it can damage the nerve tissue inside the tooth. Increased sensitivity, especially to hot or cold foods, may indicate this condition.

Tooth Discoloration: Tooth resorption can lead to tooth discoloration due to changes in the internal structure of the tooth. Staining or darkening of the tooth may occur.

Swollen or tender gums: When resorption affects the tissues around the tooth root, the gums can become swollen or tender. This can often be caused by inflammation or reactions around the tooth.

Dental Movement: When tooth resorption results in loss of the root structure of the tooth, tooth movement or displacement may be observed. This may indicate a deterioration in the stability of the tooth.

Abnormal Shape or Size of the Tooth: Resorption can change the shape or size of the tooth. This can cause the tooth to have an abnormal appearance.

Inflammation: Resorption affects the tissues around the tooth, sometimes causing symptoms such as foaming or discharge.

These symptoms may indicate the presence of tooth resorption. However, these symptoms are not always associated with tooth resorption and it is important to consult a dentist when such symptoms are noticed. The dentist will assess, through clinical examination and, if necessary, radiologic imaging, to make the correct diagnosis and recommend appropriate treatment.

How Dental Resorption is Diagnosed

To accurately diagnose dental resorption, a dentist can use a variety of methods, including clinical examination, patient history and, if necessary, radiologic imaging. Here are the methods commonly used to diagnose dental resorption:

Clinical Examination: The dentist evaluates the patient's symptoms and signs on the tooth. Symptoms such as pain, sensitivity, swollen gums are taken into account during the clinical examination. Physical signs such as tooth discoloration, abnormal shape or tooth movement are also observed.

Radiologic Imaging: X-ray or other radiologic imaging techniques are used to see the internal structure of teeth. Panoramic x-rays, intraoral radiography (periapical or bitewing), and dental tomography are common methods used to detect and evaluate tooth resorption. These images provide information about the tooth's pulp chamber, root canal and surrounding tissues.

Computed tomography of teeth (CBCT): Computed tomography (CBCT) is used to obtain a three-dimensional image of the tooth. This allows a more detailed study of tooth resorption.

Transillumination: Transillumination is a method used to evaluate the internal structure of the tooth. Using a special light source, the transmittance and structure of the tooth can be observed.

Electromobility Test: The mobility of the tooth may increase due to the loss of the root structure of the tooth due to resorption. Therefore, dentists can perform an electromobility test to assess the mobility of the tooth.

Histopathologic Examination: In advanced cases, the dentist may perform a histopathologic examination to determine the cause of the resorption. This involves examining a tissue sample of the tooth under a microscope.

The diagnostic process is based on the patient's symptoms, radiological images and clinical examination. The combination of these methods helps to make an accurate diagnosis and formulate an appropriate treatment plan.

What is the Treatment for Tooth Resorption?

Treatment of tooth resorption varies depending on the type, degree and causes of resorption. Here are the commonly used tooth resorption treatment methods:

Root Canal Treatment (Endodontic Treatment):

Dental Extraction and Prosthodontics: If the resorption is too advanced and it is not possible to save the tooth, tooth extraction may be considered. It is important to replace the extracted tooth with a prosthesis, implant or other restorative options in terms of function and aesthetics.

Orthodontic Treatment: In cases of resorption caused by abnormal movements between the teeth, orthodontic treatment can be applied. Moving the teeth into their proper positions can prevent the progression of resorption.

Surgical Interventions: In some cases, surgical intervention may be necessary. Surgical procedures may be performed to remove resorbed tissue, repair damaged areas or correct other problems caused by root resorption.

Anti-Resorptive Drugs: Anti-resorptive drugs can be used to control resorption. These drugs can be used to reduce or stop the loss of resorbed tissue.

Periodontal Treatment: If resorption is associated with gum disease, periodontal treatment may be indicated. Restoring gum health can prevent the progression of resorption.

Infection Control: If there is infection under the resorption, antibiotic treatment may be given. This can help control the infection.

The treatment plan is determined depending on the type and progression of resorption and the patient's general health. Early detection and treatment can help better manage the problems associated with tooth resorption.


Updated Date:17 January 2024Creation Date:11 January 2024